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Long Ram Question
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jaded13640
Posted 2017-12-02 9:17 PM (#553582)
Subject: Long Ram Question


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Posts: 79
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My friend has a set of long rams he wants to use on his 62 Dodge Custom 880. We've got a nice 383, modified, it was a pretty fast motor in a drag car years back. He wants to use it with the long rams.

What little I know about using long rams was that people ran into problems getting them to run right on anything more than mildly modified engines. I suspect it had more to do with camshaft profile than anything else. What I've read is what they would do is the fuel would deatomize in the runners and obviously raw fuel doesn't burn well. I'm sure they also don't like being over carbed as well, that's pretty common with mopar engines in general in my experience. I don't know how Chevy engines were able to tolerate the big carbs they did when Mopar didn't but...they didn't.

If anyone has experience with using long rams, especially on heavily modified engines, am I right about the cam theory? And if so, what is it? What didn't they like, the lift, the duration, overlap? I have a feeling it would be overlap more than anything else but it's just a theory.

He's pretty insistent on using the long rams, I'd like to at least have a fighting chance at making it work.

Thanks in advance,

Wayne
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longram60
Posted 2017-12-03 12:21 AM (#553590 - in reply to #553582)
Subject: RE: Long Ram Question



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Location: Crystal River, FL
I've been racing my long ram equipped '60 Plymouth for about 17 years. I have my combination pretty well perfected, it runs 11.80's with good air. I drive it on the street some and have never had drivability issues, it's very responsive. I run the 'short' long rams, engine displaces 470 cubes with highly modified Carter 500 CFM carbs (ran the stock Carter 2903's for several years..also ran good with those). My cam is from Hughes Engine. They will recommend a grind given your specs. Mine is a hydraulic roller, duration of 228@.050 & .510" Intake, 236@.050 &.520" Exh, 108 deg lobe separation.


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Adventurer 60
Posted 2017-12-05 3:36 PM (#553756 - in reply to #553582)
Subject: Re: Long Ram Question



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Location: tailFinland
Well you can use long rams on with any cam with any big block but there may not be any benefit using them. If the engine runs over 5000 rpm they are totally useless and reduce power and torque on higher rpms.
Actually all modern car engines have ram intake even it does not look like it.
Originally ram engines were with 268 degree 0.430 lift old fashined designed cam that was retarded 4 degrees, centerline 114 lobe 110 degrees, overlap 48. Torque peak 495 ftlbs was as low as 2800 rpm (short ram 3400 rpm)
Yes, lot of over lap and and high compression is a thing for ram-effect.
You can read more about ram intakes at 300 club website.

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BigBlockMopar
Posted 2017-12-10 6:20 AM (#554022 - in reply to #553582)
Subject: Re: Long Ram Question



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Posts: 3353
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Location: Netherlands
In my '60 Chrysler NewYorker I'm running a solid roller cam in a 496" stroker engine with Edelbrock heads and long ram intakes.
Fully balanced internals, stock transmission and stall convertor.

Cold starts are a bit finicky and require playing with the throttle for a while until some heat gets into the heads and intakes.
I like to convert the car's fuel system to LPG which will take care of the cold-drivability issues all by itself.

Got more info and enginebuild pics on my site;
https://www.bigblockmopar.nl/cars/1960-chrysler-newyorker/


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Powerflite
Posted 2017-12-10 11:52 AM (#554031 - in reply to #553582)
Subject: Re: Long Ram Question



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Location: So. California
I'm planning to run a set of long rams that have been converted to short ram by removing the center divider. I am planning to convert it to ported fuel injection. Seems the best for these so that no exhaust connection is required.
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Sonoramic60
Posted 2017-12-10 9:51 PM (#554068 - in reply to #554031)
Subject: Re: Long Ram Question


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Jaded --
The photos I've seen of the 413 engine purported to be in the '61 Dart Pioneer the Ramchargers drove so well at the 1961 NHRA Nationals S/S had the long 30" ram tubes, but the caption reads they were "modified to shorten the interior walls." To me, they were very similar to the "short" long rams of the 300F and G "Specials" as the valleys between the individual ram tubes extend only about 15" from the heads. These photos are in a 1962 "HOT ROD Magazine" special on "Chrysler Corporation Cars PERFORMANCE Handbook." However, as Powerflite indicated, the long rams are often modified internally and, in fact, this was what was done to Al Eckstrand's '60 383 SonoRamic Fury that won the 1960 NHRA S/SA class. Both the '60 Fury and '61 Dart used the Carter AFBs, but while the '60 had the ordinary ram cam with hydraulics, the '61 had a RC-92 cam of 292 degrees duration with solid lifters (plus 12.5- or 13-1 Forged-True pistons).
Too bad Ecstrand and Jim Thornton are no long with us. They both were quite easy to talk to and would have been of considerable help.
Joe Godec
'57 Chrysler 300C, '60 Fury SonoRamic, '65 Fuelie Vette, '65 Sport Fury 426-S/4-speed (or some 1400-1500 old horses in the corral)
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